Terms &Β Abbreviations

Note: the labels and terms on this page are person-specific. Just because we know the definition of a particular term doesn’t mean that someone necessarily identifies with it. Many of us make unconscious assumptions based on the perceived meanings of identity labels, and being aware of this is an important part of learning.Β 

Whether or not you’re familiar with the labels someone uses, rather than ask “what does it mean?'” ask “what does it mean to you?”Β  That’s what we do in the podcast πŸ™‚

Abinary

This means an identity not just outside of the binary (non-binary) but completely separate from it, or outside of it.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Jay.

AFAB

Assigned Female At Birth

AGAB

Assigned Gender At Birth

Allosexual

Someone is allosexual if they experience sexual attraction. It is the opposite of asexual.

AMAB

Assigned Male At Birth

Ace

Sort for asexual, which is a spectrum of identities for folks who experience no (or very rare, or infrequent) sexual attraction to others.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Mel, Bonnie, Theo Will, Katy, Hannah, Jay, Emme and Dorothy.

Agender

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, meaning to be genderless, not identifying with (any) gender at all. That said, agender folks may use other gender-specific labels in addition to this one, which may seem counterintuitive.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Alf, Cassian, Jareth, Harris, Jin and Emme.Β 

Androgyne

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, which means being simultaneously male/masculine as well as female/feminine, or in between the two.

Androgynous

A quality of being both masculine (andro) and feminine (gyne) in appearance and expression; having a combination of both male and female traits, OR a neutral presentation.

Aro

Short for aromantic, which means to experience no (or very rare, or infrequent) romantic attraction.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Mel, Theo Will and Jay.

Asexual

A spectrum of identities for folks who experience no (or very rare, or infrequent) sexual attraction to others.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Mel, Bonnie, Theo Will, Katy, Hannah, Jay, Emme and Dorothy.

Bigender

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, meaning that someone has two specific gender identities. These may be binary or non-binary gender identities.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Lor, Dorothy (Thyo) and Jen.

Binary

‘The gender binary’ refers to the assumption that the only two genders are man and woman. The description has its origin in binary code, which consists of two options: 0 or 1. So it’s a clear either/or situation; either this, or that. If someone identifies as anything other than, or outside of, these two binaries, they may fall under the umbrella-term ‘non-binary’.

BIPOC

An abbreviation for Black, Indigenous and People Of Colour.

Bisexual

This is used by folks who experience sexual attraction to two or more genders. Some perceive it to mean ‘to be attracted to two genders’ (which is rooted in assumptions of a gender binary), as in men and women, but many bisexuals are attracted to multiple genders. Therefore, there is some overlap with the pansexual label.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Alys Wilfred (Fred) (part 1), Sarah, Angus, Joe, Sally, Jay, Greyson and Jen.

Cisgender

Someone is cisgender when their birth sex matches their gender identity. They feel aligned and comfortable with being either a man or a woman. Cisgender is not a slur; it is simply a term, like transgender.

Cishet (or cis/het, cis-het)

A term to describe being cisgender (either man or woman) and heterosexual (attracted to the ‘opposite’ sex).

Demiboy

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, meaning to partially identify as boy or man. Folks who identify with this term may or may not use other gender labels as well.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Jareth and Lor.

Demigirl

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, meaning to partially identify as girl or woman. Folks who identify with this term may or may not use other gender labels as well.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Kit (part 1) and Kit (part 2).

DSD

Disorders of Sex Development. This is a controversial term used for Intersex people, and “Difference in Sex Development” or “Diverse Sex Development” is suggested as a better alternative.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Sarah and Lor.

‘E’

Estrogen or oestrogen. If someone refers to ‘taking E’ or ‘being on E’ that’s what they mean – when it’s about gender at least πŸ˜‰

enby, enbie, eNBy, NBi, NBy

Abbreviations for non-binary. As with all labels, these are very person-specific; for example, some folks find the term ‘enby’ infantilising.

Femme Boy / Femboy

This is a term used by gender non-conforming folks who fit more on the masculine side (in whatever form) in their identity, but present in a more feminine way. It is more about gender expression than gender identity.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Joe and Dorothy.

FTM or F2M

Female To Male. Someone who is transitioning (or has transitioned) from female to male. A binary transition.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Ray and Charlie Orriss.

Gay

A term for men who are (often exclusively) attracted to men. It is also used to describe same-sex (or similar gender) attraction, or can simply refer to being non-straight.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Charlie, Ray, Jacob and Brian.

Gender Invert

Someone whose gender is the opposite of their birth sex, and who accepts both their sex and gender as natural and right.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Allan. You can read more about the term in his blog post here.

Gender Non-Conforming

This refers to folks whose gender presentation does not conform to (binary) gender norms, and/or their gender expression may not reflect their actual gender identity. The term is used mostly by transgender and non-binary folks, but it may be used by cis people as well.

Genderfluid

A gender identity that changes; that is not set. It can change consistently (daily, weekly, monthly, etc) or randomly; and between any and all genders.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Kit (part 1), Alys Wilfred (Fred) (part 1), Alys Wilfred (Fred) (part 2), Kit (part 2), and Theo Will (TW).

Genderflux

An identity where the intensity of one’s gender fluctuates. It could be considered a type of genderfluid.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Jareth.

Genderqueer

This term is used by people who have a gender experience that is different from the norm or the mainstream. It can be a gender identity of its own as well as an umbrella term.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Allan, Kyl, Genevieve, Jay and Dean.

GIC

Gender Identity Clinic

GNC

Gender Non-Conforming; referring to folks whose gender presentation may not reflect their actual gender. This term is used mostly by transgender and non-binary folks, but it may be used by cis people as well.

GRC

Gender Recognition Certificate

HRT

Hormone Replacement Therapy

IGM

Intersex Genital Mutilation; a term that refers to any non-consensual surgery performed on intersex people. Parents of babies born with genital intersex characteristics are recommended (or pressured) by doctors to undergo medically unnecessary ‘normalising’ surgery, to make external genitals appear more typically ‘male’ or ‘female’, and may also involve removing and/or altering internal sex organs. Intersex people of any age may experience this; not just infants, because some people only discover later in life that they are intersex.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Sarah, Ela and Lor.,

Intersex

Intersex individuals have variations in the development of sex characteristics that do not fit typical male or female norms. These variations can include internal and external genitalia, chromosomes, and hormones. Intersex is part of the LGBT+ umbrella, but not all intersex folks consider themselves a part of the LGBT+ community.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Sarah and Lor.

Lesbian

A term for women who are (often exclusively) attracted to women. It is also used by some non-binary folks or other gender-diverse identities.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Theo Will (TW) and Angus (Annie).

Maverique

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, that is entirely separate from ‘conventional’ genders and gendered concepts like masculine and feminine. It’s not the absence of gender, or gender neutrality, but its own unique gender identity.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Jay.

MTF or M2F

Male To Female. Someone who is transitioning (or has transitioned) from male to female. A binary transition.

Non-binary

With the binary being man and woman, non-binary refers to gender identities other than these. This is an umbrella term; a spectrum that includes identities between the binaries, outside the binaries, or completely separate from the binaries. Rather than thinking of non-binary as a sliding scale between the binaries of man and woman, some consider it more three-dimensional, like a galaxy surrounding the binary genders. Some non-binary folks may be transgender as well, while others are not.

‘NB’ is sometimes used to abbreviate ‘Non-Binary’, however it is also used in the black community to mean ‘Non-Black’. Even though context would often make it clear what is meant, it is suggested that other abbreviations are used, such as enby, enbie, eNBy, NBi or NBy.Β As with all labels, these are very person-specific; for example, some folks find the term ‘enby’ infantilising.

Pansexual

This means to experience sexual attraction to any and all genders. Pansexuals may find gender irrelevant or not important in their attractions.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Sally, Jay and Victor.

Queer

This is an identity that can encompass gender and sexuality, as well as other facets of identity that differ from the norm or are unconventional or non-conforming. It can be used as an umbrella term, or as an identity or orientation of its own.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Felix, Rachel Lange, Genevieve, Jay, Juno and Emme.

‘T’

Testosterone. If someone refers to ‘taking T’ or ‘being on T’ that’s what they mean.

Trans man

Someone who was not assigned male at birth (AMAB) but identifies (at least in part) as a man (a social transition), or someone who has transitioned (socially and/or medically) from female to male. This transition is often a binary one, however some trans men may also resonate with additional (non-binary) gender identities or labels.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Charlie Caine, Sam, Ray, Charlie Orriss, Laurence, Dean and Greyson.

Trans woman

Someone who was not assigned female at birth (AFAB) but identifies (at least in part) as a woman (a social transition), or someone who has transitioned (socially and/or medically) from male to female. This transition is often a binary one, however some trans women may also resonate with additional (non-binary) gender identities or labels.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Ela, Hannah, Angus, Rachel Lawson, Cassie, Cameron, Bella, Evey, Sally, Charlize, Helen and Lynn.

Trans-feminine

This term is used by people who were not assigned female at birth (AFAB), but are partially or fully feminine in identity.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Kit (part 1), Harri Elouise, Kit (part 2) and Cameron.

Trans-masculine

This term is used by people who were not assigned male at birth (AMAB), but are partially or fully masculine in identity.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Alys Wilfred (Fred) (part 1), Alys Wilfred (Fred) (part 2), Bonnie, Harris, Dean and Dorothy.

Transgender

A person may be – or identify as – transgender when their gender identity doesn’t match their birth sex.

Transsexual

This is an older term, introduced into the English language around 1950, and was used for people who wanted to medically transition. For several decades after, it seemed to be the only term available for people to relate to if they struggled with, or were confused by, their gender identity – even before the word ‘gender’ was understood in the way it is now. Although isn’t as commonly used any more and many find it outdated, some folks still identify with it.

To learn more, listen to the conversations with Sophie and Evey.

Transvestite

Two-Spirit

An umbrella term used exclusively by Native North Americans for gender identities other than cis, and sexual orientations other than heterosexual. It may be considered an Indigenous LGBT+ identity by some (inclusive abbreviations could be LGBTQ2S or LGBTQIA2S+), and can also include spirituality and alternative relationship styles.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Beverly Little Thunder.

Xenogender

A gender identity that falls under the non-binary umbrella, meaning a gender identity that cannot be well described through conventional gendered language. Instead, xenogender individuals resonate more with things like animals, plants, or objects when it comes to describing their identity; subjects that most people do not consider as relating to gender.

To learn more, listen to the conversation with Greyson.

We are continually expanding and updating the glossary.
You can find additional labels and terms on the LGBTA Wiki,Β LGBTA WikiΒ and lgbtiq.xyz.

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